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Egypt’s Great Pyramid Reveals New Secret

Scientists have made a groundbreaking discovery inside Egypt's Great Pyramid: a previously unknown hidden passageway.
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The pyramids of Giza and the Great Sphinx, in Egypt
Mysterious passage found in the Great Pyramid of Egypt!

The Great Pyramid, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, is one of the most iconic structures on the planet and is believed to have been built more than 4,500 years ago during the reign of Khufu. For years, experts knew that something was concealed above the entrance to the Great Pyramid, and now they have finally uncovered it.

The passageway is located above the Grand Gallery, a long corridor with a steep incline that leads to the burial chamber of the pharaoh Khufu. The newly discovered passage appears to descend from the north face of the pyramid towards the gallery.

The discovery has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the pyramid’s construction and Egyptian history, and offers the prospect of further insight into the secrets it may still hold. It was made using advanced imaging technology that enabled researchers to see inside the pyramid without physically entering it.

Experts have long debated the purpose of the pyramid’s various features and the methods used to construct it. The new discovery provides tantalizing clues that could help shed light on these mysteries. This exciting discovery, after a seven-year long search, sheds new light on the mystique of the Great Pyramid

The passageway’s function remains unclear, but it is possible that it was used during the pyramid’s construction to transport building materials or during Khufu’s burial ceremony. The experts plan to continue their work and hope to map the passageway to learn more about its purpose. The passageway measures nine meters or 30 feet long and is located close to the main entrance of the pyramid.

Advanced imaging technology was used to find the hidden passageway in the great pyramid

The discovery was made using modern scanning technology which involved a combination of infrared thermography, muon radiography imaging, and 3D reconstruction. Scientists from the ScanPyramids project set up muon detectors at various points to map the location and shape of the secret corridor. Muon radiography is a process that uses cosmic-ray muons to create images of the inside of solid structures such as pyramids.

These methods are non-invasive, and the recent discovery of the hidden chamber within the Great Pyramid was made possible through the ScanPyramids project.

The discovery of the hidden passageway is a significant milestone in the ongoing study of the Great Pyramid and will undoubtedly prompt further research and debate.

Study Finds Medieval Eclipse Records Reveal Timing of Volcanic Activity

Monks looking at the moon to try to predict the biblical end times have inadvertently left accurate data to help researchers understand the era's massive volcanic eruptions.
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A darker moon during a lunar eclipse can indicate the presence of volcanic dust in the atmosphere

Careful records of the color of lunar eclipses made by medieval monks, keeping watch for the blood-red moon predicting the end times in the Book of Revelation, have helped an international team of researchers understand almost exactly when some of the biggest volcanic eruptions in human history happened. The innovative study documenting these findings, a result of an almost five-year research process, was published in the journal Nature.

Information found in historical texts from Europe and the Middle East, combined with ice core samples and tree ring data, has given new insights into what is seen to be the most volcanically active period in human experience. Specifically, this is the time span between 1100 and 1300, where the amount of volcanic dust interacting with the atmosphere and reducing sunlight reaching Earth is thought to have caused a subsequent cool period known as the Little Ice Age.

When asked what caused him to look to monks’ records to help determine the time of the major eruptions, lead author of the study Sébastien Guillet from the University of Geneva pointed to an unlikely inspiration. “I was listening to Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon album when I realized that the darkest lunar eclipses all occurred within a year or so of major volcanic eruptions. Since we know the exact days of the eclipses, it opened the possibility of using the sightings to narrow down when the eruptions must have happened.”

Between the years 1100 and 1300, Europe witnessed a total of 64 lunar eclipses. Of these, 51 instances have been recorded and documented by diligent chroniclers of the era. In five of these chronicles, it was noted that the moon appeared unusually dark during the eclipse, indicating recent volcanic activity where the resultant atmospheric dust dimmed the reflected lunar light.

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Plants do ‘talk’ – scientific study finds

You’ve heard of the adage “talk to your plants”. Well, that appears to be very sage advice because a recent study proves that plants can communicate.
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Researchers have found that the more stressed plants are, the more they "talk"
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Plants are not silent. According to a study, plants talk by making clicking noises. In fact, they become very talkative when under stress, such as when they are thirsty.

These new findings vastly contradict previous beliefs held by botanists – that the plant kingdom is silent. Researchers suggest that the world is a cacophony of noise made by plants – sounds that cannot be detected by the human ear.

The study was conducted by Lilach Hadany of Tel Aviv University. She is the program head of the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences and a professor at the university’s School of Plant Sciences and Food Security.

Prof Hadany admits that she has always been skeptical about the silence of plants because organisms respond to sound, so why should plants be mute and deaf? Previous studies proved that plants vibrated. However, it had not been established if these vibrations were in fact sound waves that became air borne.

Ultrasonic microphones recorded stressed plants talking up to 30 to 50 times an hour

Prof Hadany’s interest in the subject was first ‘pricked’ by a cactus in her laboratory six years ago that she recorded with an ultrasonic microphone. However, she could not overrule the possibility that the sounds recorded were not made by the plant but by something else in the environment.

In the latest study, researchers used soundproof acoustic boxes, fitted with ultrasonic microphones, into which tomato and tobacco plants were placed. Some of the plants had damaged stems and had not been watered for five days. The other plants were untouched.

These microphones record frequencies between 20 and 250 kilohertz, while the maximum frequency detected by the human ear is about 16 kilohertz.

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Unprecedented Discovery: An Earth-Sized Exoplanet Which May Have an Atmosphere

Bursts of radio waves likely caused by a star's solar winds interacting with an exoplanet's magnetic field have caused excitement in the search for potentially life-bearing planets.
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Radio telescopes help scientists search for Earth-like planets

Two US astronomers recently discovered an Earth-sized rocky exoplanet located roughly 12 light years away. This represents an exciting step forward in the search for potentially habitable or life-bearing worlds in other solar systems. Researchers have been able to confirm that the exoplanet (a planet existing outside our Solar System) may, like Earth, possess its own strong magnetic field and possibly even atmosphere.

Unusually strong bursts of radio waves, hypothesized to be caused by the interaction of the exoplanet with plasma spewed out from its star, caught the attention of the two researchers, Sebastian Pineda and Jackie Villadsen, when they were assessing data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio telescope in the state of New Mexico, USA.

“Whether a planet survives with an atmosphere or not can depend on whether the planet has a strong magnetic field or not,” said Pineda. Such fields are believed to be essential for the protection of the planet’s atmosphere and potential life from harmful solar winds emitting from its star.

The exoplanet, called YZ Ceti b, orbits a red dwarf star called YZ Ceti within the constellation Cetus. The duration of its orbit around the star is just two days. In contrast, the closest planet to our Sun, Mercury, has an orbit time of 88 days. The fact that YZ Ceti b is very close to its star could have maximized the interaction between its magnetic field and the plasma winds, leading to what are referred to as bright radio signals.

“This research shows not only that this particular rocky exoplanet likely has a magnetic field but provides a promising method to find more,” says Joe Pesce of the US’s National Science Foundation.

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