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Lying Awake? Learn How to Sleep Better by Understanding Your Body’s Needs

Struggling to sleep and not feeling well-rested is a common experience which can be changed for the better with some simple tips.
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Say goodbye to insomnia: Fall asleep easily with these simple habits

A good night’s sleep is essential for overall wellbeing, a healthy immune system, and productivity. However, with stressful lives and modern-day gadgets playing havoc on our sleep schedule, it becomes imperative to follow certain guidelines to ensure a sound sleep that can leave us rejuvenated in the morning.

The sleep-wake pattern is the most well-known circadian rhythm, and it helps control an individual’s behaviors, including body temperature, hormone regulation, and metabolism. Circadian rhythms are not unique to humans as most living things have these cycles. These processes are primarily physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a repetitive pattern.

The circadian rhythm is normally driven by the sun’s light/dark cycle, so be mindful of your exposure to light before falling asleep and while you are asleep. Screens emit a high-intensity blue light that can keep your mind active and reduce the quality of your sleep.

There are certain things that one should avoid before bedtime, such as large meals, caffeine, and alcohol. Instead, some exercise during the day can help one fall asleep more easily at night. Regular exercise helps in regulating natural sleep hormones like melatonin. Nevertheless, avoiding a workout just before bedtime is also essential.

Taking time to relax before bed is necessary. Listening to relaxing music, reading a book, taking a hot bath or shower, meditating and deep breathing are some suggestions that can help the body prepare for rest.

It is also important to avoid sleeping in, even on weekends, to maintain a consistent sleep pattern. Experts suggest that your sleep cycle can be best managed by going to sleep and waking up at the same times every day.

Breakthrough Discovery: Scientists Find Potential Cure for Yellow Fever

New research has found lab-made antibodies may treat the killer-disease spread by some mosquitoes.
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Mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemogogus are the vectors of the virus

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the treatment of yellow fever, a disease which until now has been untreatable. The disease, which is spread by mosquitoes, infects around 200,000 people each year, with 30,000 of those infected dying from the illness.

Currently, yellow fever is most prevalent in tropical and subtropical Africa and South America. However, due to the impacts of climate change, the range of the mosquitoes that spread the virus is expected to greatly increase. Warmer temperatures and increased rainfall are predicted to extend their range.

The number of deaths from yellow fever in Africa alone is predicted to increase by up to 25% by the year 2050. This change highlights the susceptibility of human populations to the global effects of climate change on public health.

A yellow fever vaccine has been available since the 1930s and is an effective preventative measure against the disease. The vaccine works by injecting a weakened form of the yellow fever virus into the recipient’s body. However, there is an adverse, though rarely fatal, affect in a small percentage of vaccine recipients, leading to some vaccine hesitancy.

Even though the vaccine is available, yellow fever continues to be a major health threat because it has no medical cure. This is where the newly-developed treatment comes into play. Scientists have been able to create lab-made antibodies that have been used to effectively treat yellow fever in rhesus macaque monkeys and hamsters.

The next step for scientists will be to further test the antibodies to ensure their safety and efficacy. With continued research and development, there is hope that this breakthrough could lead to a significant reduction in the number of people affected by yellow fever each year.

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Allergies: Why Are We Seeing More and More People Affected?

The World Health Organization (WHO) predicts that one in two people will be allergic by 2050, twice as many as today.
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An allergen epidemic: the growing public health challenge
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According to statistics, 25% to 30% of the world’s population currently suffers from allergies and the number of people affected is increasing. Allergies are an inappropriate reaction of the body following contact with a normally tolerated substance. In response, the cells of the immune system create symptoms that can affect one or more parts of the body and be particularly disabling in daily life.

There are different types of allergy, each with its own characteristics. The most common forms are respiratory allergy (caused by allergens such as pollen, dust mites, dust and animal hair), food allergy (embodied mainly by peanuts, seafood and dairy products), skin allergy (reflected in cosmetics, perfumes and cleaning products) and drug allergy (which can generate severe reactions).

Symptoms materialize in many ways depending on the type of allergy contracted. Allergies most often cause skin, respiratory or generalized manifestations. The reactions caused can be severe and potentially fatal in some cases.

Air pollution, global warming and lifestyle are in the spotlight as potential causes

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 50% of the world’s population will be allergic by 2050. The exact causes of this increase are not yet clearly defined, but several theories are being put forward.

First of all, there is the genetic predisposition that greatly influences the susceptibility to develop allergies. Indeed, an individual with allergic parents is more likely to be allergic himself. Air pollution is also incriminated because it would promote respiratory allergies by increasing the allergens in the air, such as fine particles, pesticides, industrial waste and dust.

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